【PART 4】 The Mystery of Security Treaty Village (2): The UN Charter and the Postwar World

 

16】 Okinawa issue can only be dealt with as racism

 

There is something that comes to mind when I talk about this.

In the past, when I had the chance to talk to a Japanese person working for the UN, I asked him this. “In Okinawa, U.S. aircraft avoid flying over American residences, while flying dangerously low over Japanese homes. Crash accidents have actually happened. Please call the attention of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) to this outrageous reality and have them recognize this issue.” “Unfortunately, we cannot do that. If this were to be raised as an issue, it would be as a human rights issue,” was his reply.

This is absurd. What is racist about this issue? If this were to be raised as an issue, it would be as a racism issue,” was their reply. This is absurd. What is racist about this issue? What is the role of the UNHRC anyway, if they cannot deal with such a clear violation of human rights?

The UN Charter states that one of the UN’s main goals is “respect for all human rights,” in Article 1-3. It also clearly stipulates that commissions be set up to achieve this goal. The UNHRC (called the UN Commission on Human Rights until 2006) was set up based on these articles of the Charter.

This council works for the protection of human rights, so in the Fukushima nuclear disaster for example, the “Special Rapporteur (on the right of health)” appointed by the UNHRC actually came to Japan. He conducted research on the radioactive situation and gave detailed counsel to the Japanese government for the protection of residents’ health.

Moreover, in December 2013, the Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression showed serious concern about the Special Secrecy Law enacted by the Abe administration.

Then why can’t the UNHRC Special Rapporteur make any statements about the issue of Okinawa? Also, what does this issue have to do with racism?