【PART 5】  The Last Mystery Voluntary slavish obedience and its historical origin

 

【8】 The Showa Emperor’s “message to Dulles”

 

Now, the “Okinawa message” has become quite well-known. However, the other “Emperor’s message” may not be known by many.

What I’m referring to is the Showa Emperor’s message to Dulles on June 26, 1950, sent to him while he was in Japan. (Yasumasa Matsudaira, one of the Emperor’s aides, conveyed it to Pakenham, Newsweek Tokyo bureau chief reporter and CIA collaborator, who related the content verbally to Dulles.) Its content was also documented officially two months later, on August 19, and sent to Dulles, so we can learn about it in detail. The person who discovered this document was Ikuhiko Hata, then professor at Takushoku University. (Five Decisions of Emperor Hirohito)

In relation to the “Okinawa message,” this message to Dulles was also very significant. The Okinawa message was delivered to MacArthur from the Showa Emperor, disregarding the Japanese government. Now, in this second verbal message in 1950, the Emperor contacted Dulles (State Department) directly, disregarding not only the Japanese government but also MacArthur (GHQ).

The most notable part of this documented message is its claim that the basic policy taken by Prime Minister Yoshida at that point towards a peace treaty was mistaken. It said this issue should be handled by those “with who are experienced and trusted by both Japan and the U.S.,” and that “the mistaken argument over the continued use of military bases in Okinawa could’ve been avoided, with a voluntary request from Japan.”

It is clear that the “mistaken argument” referred to here is Yoshida’s answer to questions posed to him in the Diet (July 29, 1950), right before the documentation of this message. He stated, “I am thinking that I wouldn’t like to lease military bases,” clearly reluctant about the U.S. Forces’ occupation.

Therefore, the “voluntary request from Japan” mentioned in this message means a voluntary request to have U.S. Forces continue to occupy Okinawa.